11 May 2015 @ 11:50 AM 

A bit of a shorter post. Sort of a “progress” report on some of the personal stuff I’ve worked on recently.

BASeBlock

I’ve come to form a love/hate relationship with BASeBlock. This is mostly because there are a lot of things I like about it’s design, and a lot of things I hate, and the things I dislike tend to be difficult to change. Some of the basic dislikes includes a lack of DPI support and how it won’t actually scale to larger sizes. On my monitor it is now tiny which is annoying and pretty much trash in the form of an action game. I’ve brainstormed a few solutions. The simplest would be to simply scale up the bitmap that get’s drawn to the screen. That is still a pain but is doable. Another would be to go a step further and actually scale everything in the game itself to larger sizes. That would be a rather large undertaking, to the point that I’m not even sure it would be worth the effort. I made a few minor revisions to try to get it to scale using the first method but ended up shelving that work for the moment. It’s rather disappointing to find such glaring problems with your old projects that you put so much time into, and almost painful to even consider just shelving the project entirely and just moving on. I certainly made a lot of mistakes with BASeBlock but I think it does well for a game using such basic capabilities (GDI+ drawing for a Game is rather unorthodox!).

Prehender

3-D programming is incredibly annoying and uses math that is far beyond my abilities to actually comprehend. Viewmatrices, rotation matrices, dot products. It’s basically a case of Googling to find out how to do things, then hoping I can figure out how to get the math to work with OpenTK. Nonetheless, I have managed to make a bit of progress.

As with BASeBlock and realistically any game I make going forward most likely, it’s primary purpose is for learning stuff. BASeBlock is at this point “learning” how to refactor an old codebase to improve it, whereas originally it was for learning C#. Prehender is going to be both applying the design techniques I learned since creating BASeBlock as well as being my first 3-D game. With that in mind, it is a rather simple concept.

Originally, I was going to just create some sort of 3-D Block breaker. I have a rather unhealthy fetish with them or something. But I decided to change it up a bit. I decided to “steal” a bit of the design of the 2-D Game, “Spring-up Harmony” which effectively uses a physics engine, and you shoot coloured balls at coloured blocks. If you hit a matching block it will “loosen” from the static background and will interact with other blocks. Then you can catch them with your “bucket” at the bottom of the screen. I haven’t worked out all the details but right now I have it so you shoot coloured balls at an arrangement of cubes, and when a coloured ball touches a coloured block, the block loosens and will fall. I haven’t actually figured out the gameplay specifics, though. That does bring me to the title, though- 3-D programming is quite difficult. I haven’t used Unity before, I may give it a go at some point, however my interest in creating games is typically in what I can learn about actually making them- Unity seems to be more for people interested in making games, as it abstracts some of the parts I find interesting. But in my case, I’m using C# and OpenTK. Unfortunately this means I get the fun of dealing with concepts such as Projection and View Matrices, Dot Products, cross products, and the like. My math also fails me as I’m not able to determine the Camera position from the projection and view matrix, which is a bit goofy when I want to shoot the balls from the position of the camera.

On the bright side, this does make it (IMO) a more useful learning experience. I find it rather strange that I’ve had to resort to third party libraries (OpenTK and BASS.NET) for providing 3-D display and compressed audio capabilities into my C# Program. XNA has been rather left behind (Though still works) and it has a few omissions that I found frustrating when I was working on BCDodger. I would hope that .NET is given first-party support for creating games in the future that makes the task much easier but allows us to use the full power of .NET and C#. Sort of an XNA successor allowing us to also publish to XBox One. (Heck if such a library was made available even at cost I think I could justify an XBox One.)

BCSearch .NET

BCSearch, my VB6 program works, but working on it is pretty much a non-starter these days. I am impressed with the patience I used to have working with Visual Basic 6 only 7 short years ago. Some features of the program will simply not be brought to completion.

Instead, I would like to create a modern WPF Windows Application that uses modern programming (and async await and such) for the same purpose. The effective goal is to create a rather straightforward on-demand search program. This differs from standard Start->Search and the search tool of Windows Explorer in that it is a full application oriented around searches and dealing with the results of those searches. I often find myself trying to find files based on rather specific criteria, and in that context I can see myself using an imagined BCSearch.NET that allows me to write a short C# method in a textbox for filtering each file. This would also allow me to rethink some of the weird architecture decisions I made with BCSearch, while also allowing me to work with WPF again (my work is almost exclusive Windows Forms, and the last time I really worked with WPF was with BCJobClock).

Posted By: BC_Programming
Last Edit: 11 May 2015 @ 11:50 AM

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